Legislation and Compliance

There are a number of guidelines and regulations affecting the industry. They are as follows:

  • The Workplace (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations 1992
  • Fire (Scotland) Act 2005
  • Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (England & Wales)
  • B&ES TR19 Internal Cleanliness of Ventilation Systems
  • BSEN 15780 – Ventilation for Buildings – Ventilation – Cleanliness of Ventilation Systems

Click here for: B&ES TR19 | BSEN 15780 | Fire (Scotland) Act 2005 | The Workplace Regulations

The Workplace (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations 1992

The Workplace Regulations directly refers to ventilation in terms of provide adequate, fresh and unpolluted air throughout the workplace and that any ventilations systems used to do so should also be adequately maintained in terms of mechanically, electrically and cleanliness.

Fire (Scotland) Act 2005

The responsibility of carrying out fire risk assessments lies with building owners, occupiers and employers. In a nutshell, this means that the responsible person has to look at and identify all fire risks within the building and look at ways to either remove that risk completely or how to reduce it. Particular reference is made to kitchen extract systems that carry grease away from cooking areas to a point of discharge. Grease laden ductwork and other surfaces will combust if the ductwork surface becomes hot enough to make this happen. The common belief previously was that a naked flame had to come into contact with grease to ignite it and this now shows the importance of a specialist contractor cleaning the full systems and not just an area seen in the kitchen or an area close to an ignition source. Failure to have kitchen extract systems cleaned and certified to B&ES TR19 guidelines by a specialist contractor will result in void insurance policies claimed upon following a fire.

B&ES TR19 – Guide to Good Practice, Internal Cleanliness of Ventilation Systems

If there is anything you need to know about the internal cleanliness of ventilation systems then you will find it in here. Whether you need to know about cleaning intervals for your specific system, what ductwork hygiene test method should be used or what information should be included on post clean verification of cleanliness certificates, this is THE industry standard that will tell you all of that and lots more. The standard that insurance companies look to for guidance and the standard that building and facilities managers look to for guidance. Non-members of the B&ES can also purchase these guidelines and work to these standards however these companies won’t have gone through a rigorous, independently operated inspection and assessment process that all companies go through before joining the B&ES membership.

B&ES TR19 – Recommended cleaning cycles for kitchen extract systems

Level of grease production

Example

Up to 6hrs

6-12hrs

12-16hrs

16+hrs

Low

No significant production of grease laden air

12mths

12mths

6mths

6mths

Medium

Moderate production of grease laden air

12mths

6mths

4mths

3mths

High

Heavy production of grease laden air

6mths

3mths

2mths

2mths

BSEN 15780 – Ventilation for buildings – Ductwork – Cleanliness of ventilation systems

This British Standard is also a definitive publication for the cleanliness of ventilation systems and our air hygiene technicians are fully trained to this standard alongside the B&ES TR19 publication. Throughout this publication you’ll find in-depth references to identify acceptable dust accumulation levels and also a helpful example of cleaning plan very much like our ventilation maintenance programmes are based upon. The BSEN 15780 also states the recommended inspection intervals for ventilation systems.

Recommended Inspection Intervals – BSEN 15780

AHU

Filters

Humidifiers

Ductwork

Air Terminal Devices

Low

24mths

12mths

12mths

48mths

48mths

Medium

12mths

12mths

6mths

24mths

24mths

High

12mths

6mths

6mths

12mths

12mths

Levels Typical Examples
Low Rooms with only intermediate occupancy e.g. storage rooms, technical rooms
Medium Offices, hotels, restaurants, schools, theatres, residential homes, shopping areas, exhibition buildings, sport buildings, general areas in hospitals and general working areas in industries
High Laboratories, treatment areas in hospitals, high quality offices